Find out who owns your journal article

There is a lot to keep track of when it comes to open access publishing. To help you find your way we’re publishing five blog posts with quick tips for researchers. These will hopefully make the process of publishing your paper with open access a bit easier.

Tip #2: Find out who owns your journal article

If you publish in a traditional subscription-based journal without open access you will sign a copyright transfer agreement. This means that the publisher, not you, owns all text, figures, tables and images that are part of your paper. Depending on what the details of the agreement says, this limits how you can share and use the contents of the article you have published. Remember to check the fine print of the agreement if you know you will need to reuse the paper as a chapter in a thesis or similar!

Figure courtesy of the Office of Scholarly Communications, University of Cambridge used under CC BY 4.0.

Many publishers allow the reuse of the author’s accepted manuscript. For example, most of the time you will be allowed to publish the accepted manuscript in DiVA or similar repositories. Often the journal will have an embargo period ranging from 6 to 48 months before the article can be shared publicly.

So it’s important that you remember to save your own manuscript after the journal has accepted it! Please do upload it to DiVA, which can serve as a storage area for you so you don’t end up accidentally losing it. After you have uploaded a manuscript a librarian will check to make sure it is only published in compliance with the journal’s policies. Any embargo period will be added to the paper in DiVA by the librarian, meaning that the manuscript will be published first after the end of the embargo period.

On Monday we give you some information on how to check what you are allowed to do with your accepted manuscript.


Save your approved manuscript!

There is a lot to keep track of when it comes to open access publishing. To help you find your way we’re publishing five blog posts with quick tips for researchers. These will hopefully make the process of publishing your paper with open access a bit easier.

Tip #1: Save your approved manuscript!

Did you know you as an author have more rights to your accepted manuscript than the final version the publisher sends you for proofing? In many cases you are allowed to share your own version of the manuscript much more widely than the final PDF. This particularly applies to journals where you have signed over the copyright to the publisher. 

What is the approved manuscript?

  • The version the author sends the journal after peer-review and resulting edits.
  • The manuscript can be in e.g. Word format, and include row numbers and other notes. 
  • The text in the approved manuscript is identical with the journal’s final version, with the possible exception of minor typos and such. 
  • The approved manuscript won’t have a journal or publisher logo anywhere.
  • The approved manuscript is also called a post-print manuscript.
Figure courtesy of the Office of Scholarly Communications, University of Cambridge used under CC BY 4.0.


Tomorrow we’ll give give you some tips on how to find out who really owns your article.

Accelarete transiton to open access

It is the time of the year to pay special attention to open access issues. One of the consequences of the interrupted negotiations between BIBSAM and Elsevier has been that a number of Swedish universities have instituted an OA fund. University of Borås is one of them. The aim is to accelerate transition to open access.

Research funders have also taken initiative to accelerate transition to open access though Plan S. 13 research financiers from 12 countries have signaled their commitment to implement 10 principles of Plan S in a coordinated way. The main principle is “By 2020 scientific publications that result from research funded by public grants provided by participating national and European research councils and funding bodies, must be published in compliant Open Access Journals or on compliant Open Access Platforms.”

More information about cOALition S.

Text: Pieta Eklund

Library Breakfast on open access and locked articles

During the International Open Access Week, we invite researchers and students at the University to a Library Breakfast on the theme of open access. This year, a lot has happened in the area of open access in Sweden. During this breakfast, research librarian Signe Wulund will, tell us about what happened to the publisher Elsevier, and present alternative routes to locked research publications. If you want to participate, you need to register before October 22nd using this form.

The breakfast consists of coffee / tea / juice, sandwich and fruit and are open to students and staff at the University of Borås. However, there are only 25 seats, and registration is mandatory in order to participate.

Text: Katharina Nordling
Photo: Mostphotos