Project aims to increase access to university research

The library has started a project aiming to increase the number of papers in full text in DiVA.

When you publish your research open and accessible, you increase the visibility and spread of it. Therefor the library has launched a project in which we check your already registered papers/ posts in DiVA, in order to know if it is possible to upload them in full text. The work is done by Manar Deeb and Signe Wulund.

For each researcher who has registered something in DiVA, a search is made for all papers that don’t have a full text uploaded today. The next step is to verify which possibility are available for publishing, and then comes the contact with the researcher by e-mail. The e-mail will contain a list of articles that could be published in full text in DiVA.

In this project work we use the SHERPA/ ROMEO database, which is a database that gathers publisher’s copyright and parallel publishing policies. Parallel publishing means to spread your research findings openly through other channels in the same time they are published by a journal which is available only for subscribers.

When it comes to parallel publishing, publishers often put up guidelines which must be followed. For example that the article cannot be parallel published until a certain time has elapsed (ie embargo time). Another common rule is that it may not be the publisher’s version (layout) of the article that’s parallel pubshed, instead the version of the article accepted by the publisher for printing, ie the one that has been subjected to a referee review, may be published. The content is the same but the parallel publishing version has different format from the publisher official PDF version.

There is a total of 2,545 publishers in SHERPA/ RoMEO, and 81 % of them allow some form of parallel publishing.

If you are interested and you want to know clearly which papers you have the right to publish in full text in DiVA, don’t hesitate to contact us.

Send an e-mail to manar.deeb@hb.se, to notify that you want us to check your publications as soon as possible. Otherwise, we will contact you when we have reached your name on the alphabetical list we are using to find all researchers in DiVA.

Text & photo: Katharina Nordling
Illustration: Screenshot from SHERPA/RoMEO

A new librarian with focus on research support

A month ago Signe Wulund started at the university library. Signe’s focus will be on research support, and it is very possible that you will meet her in the future. In Forskningsrelaterat’s sister blog (Biblioteksbloggen), a staff portrait of Signe was published today, just click and read if you want to find out who she is.

Text: Katharina Nordling

Emerald removes embargoes across all journals

Emerald Publishing launches an initiative for Open Access – Emerald Reach – a program designed to deliver rigorous high-quality open access content and increase the contents visibility. With this launch, Emerald drops all embargoes on articles. This means authors are allowed parallel publish (also known as post-print publishing or self-archiving) their article, for example in DiVA, free of charge (so-called Green Open Access).

Effective from 27 September 2017, Emerald has removed embargoes across all journals, providing authors with the option to make their accepted manuscript openly available, free from payment and embargo periods.

Read more at Emerald Publishing’s webpage.

Text: Katharina Nordling

Research Data Management – a new area for the library

During spring 2017, the library has participated in an education in managing research data. The education has been led by the Swedish National Data Service (SND) and has included several different aspects of managing research data; creation of data management plans, description of data, file management, archiving and making data available to others. For three whole days, the library team for research support, along with archivist and legal experts at the university, has studied and discussed these issues. The education has been very rewarding, and given a deeper insight to how complex these issues are, not least the legal aspects of data management. This becomes especially clear when research is about people, and personal information is handled.

After the education at SND, a training package for researchers has been planned out, and a test of this has been carried out during the late spring. For two half days, four researchers at the university have participated in lectures and workshops on the management of research data, focusing on their own data. To be able to deepen the discussions with researchers who are experts in their own data, has been rewarding to all involved (including researchers). The researchers who participated in the training are Daniel Ekwall, Helena Francke, Katarina Karlsson and Laura Darcy.

The first half day was about data management plans. Data management plans are really no news in the research process. What’s new is that the data management plan is a coherent document answering all questions about why and how data is collected, how it is preserved, and who has access to it. This document needs updating continuously during the research process. Previously, similar issues may have been raised for research applications but not at the same level of detail. Some tools that could facilitate the work on data management plans were demonstrated.

The second half day was used to talk about legal aspects of data management and archiving of research data. The focus was on the new data protection regulation, which will come into force in May 2018. The four researchers had many questions regarding the handling of personal data in the light of the new regulation.

The education at SND will be the basis for establishing a working group at the University of Borås, whose task is to assist researchers with data management plans, archiving research data and making research data accessible. Currently, the prospective group is called Data Access Unit (DAU). Similar work is ongoing at most Swedish universities since the issue of archiving and open-source research data is high on the EU agenda (Horizon 2020, for example, requires open-source research data) and in Sweden it is assumed that many research funding will in future require the inclusion of data management plan in the application for research funding and open access to research data.

Do you want us to come to your research group for a conversation or workshop about research data and data management plans? Please contact us!

Read previous posts about research data in Forskningsrelaterat.