Unpaywall and Open Access Button

”Click here to purchase article”.

You have probably seen this several times when searching for articles. You find that perfect article for your research or student thesis, but you are not allowed to read more than the abstract if you don’t want to pay for it. This is called a paywall, and if you don’t pay, you won’t get access to the article behind it. Thanks to the library employees and students at the university get access to a high number of articles online, but there are still articles that the library’s subscriptions will not include, and that are therefore not available to read. This can be very frustrating.

Lately there have been several tries to find a solution to this problem. At the Open Access Week 2014 a web browser extension called Open Access Button was introduced. You install the extension, and as soon as you hit a paywall you click the button. The extension will look for the article in other places, and in many cases it will give you a way to access the article. April 4th another extension was launched, namely Unpaywall. Unpaywall works pretty much like the Open Access Button, and the two complements each other, giving you wide access to a high amount of articles.

Both Open Access Button and Unpaywall looks for articles in open databases like ArXiv, PubMed Central, Google Scholar, and more.

The green lock to the right lets you know that Unpaywall has found a free version of the article. By clicking on the lock, you can access the article.

Kristoffer Karlsson

German universities boycott Elsevier

Since January 1st over 60 German universities and research institutionsare boycotting Elsevier. This means that German libraries do not have fulltext access to scientific journals published by Elsevier. Background is that Elsevier’s  businessmodells are not transparent nor do they provide open access to content in the extent requored by the univeristies and research institutions. Pricing is also an issue. The aim is to relieve the pressure on acquistion budgets and at improving access to scientific literature in a broad and sustainable way according to the statement made by Göttingen University – one of the participants in this boycott.

Libraries are aware of the difficult situation facing researchers, teachers and students. However, the libraries mean they are not going to give in because they have a greated possibility to influence the agreement together. Researchers should contact the library to get access to articles they need. Libraries are prepared to get them in other ways and at no cost to the reseachers.

According to Science negotiations will start in the begining of the year.

Pieta Eklund

 

OA week 2016, presentations

This years Open Access Week has come to an end, if you missed the presentations during the week you can find the PowerPoint’s here in the Blog:

SND: Datahantering och tillgång till forskningsdata (Swedish)
Biblioteksfrukost: Open access to research data (English)

If you have any questions regarding open access, open data or publishing please contact the library. oaweek

Text: Thomas

Open Access Week 2016

This year’s Open Access Week takes place between October 24-30 and this years theme is “Open in action“. Several big actors is on the move and have started to invest resources to increase the number of articles published open access. One example is the Swedish Research Council, which is investing 8 million over two years to increase publication open access research.oaweek

Research data is another topic that is likely to be affected by the future research bill. Demands on data management plans has already started to come up as part of the funding application process and in the proposed guidelines from 2015, written by the Swedish Research Council we can read that: […] research data […] should be openly available […]
Or roughly translated in context:

The basic principle of the proposed national guidelines is that scientific publications, artistic works and research data as the basis for scientific publications resulting from publicly funded research should be openly available. In both cases, given the proposed timescales for implementation. Research Council proposes that Sweden should have a vision for 2025 and the guidelines apply until 2020. Within the framework of the mandate given recommendations on what needs to be further investigated. […]

We at the Library choose to align the Open Access Week activities towards making research data available. We start the week’s activities on Tuesday, October 25th with speakers from the Swedish National Data Service (SND). Elisabeth Strandhagen and Ilze Lac, they will talk about open access to research data, and good data management; the presentation is in Swedish. Next, we have a library breakfast and a workshop in data management  that is offered in two rounds (round 1 and round 2). During these workshops we go through SND’s data management template and discuss together with the participants how and if it is possible to customise the template to fit different data types. Remember to sign up for a library breakfast.

We are always available to respond any time of the year if you have questions regarding open access and research data.

Text: Thomas